Machiavellis insight about the inner workings of absolutist governments in the prince

Jan 14, Bertrand rated it really liked it The common wisdom goes that Machiavelli's discourses present to the reader the author's republican side, whereas The Prince was more aimed at the 'godlike rulers' - indeed, under the cover of a commentary of Livy, one of the foremost classical text of Roman origin, Nicolo takes us on a journey not unlike the one he proposed to the reader of The Prince. Distinguished once again by his penetrating insights prefiguring psychology, sociology, political sciences, and calling upon strategy and common The common wisdom goes that Machiavelli's discourses present to the reader the author's republican side, whereas The Prince was more aimed at the 'godlike rulers' - indeed, under the cover of a commentary of Livy, one of the foremost classical text of Roman origin, Nicolo takes us on a journey not unlike the one he proposed to the reader of The Prince. Distinguished once again by his penetrating insights prefiguring psychology, sociology, political sciences, and calling upon strategy and common sense but with a verve and method at time borrowing from philosophy, it is yet again his amoralism that will leave it's most lasting impression: But if here again Machiavelli attempt to remain ever neutral, to cater as much to the the ruler as to the insurgent, maybe more than in The Prince one can now outline first the peculiar ideological order that sustain his worldview Virtus, Necessitas, Prudentia and Fortuna and maybe more importantly, the hushed moral preferences that connect back his writings to his life-long dedication to the republican ideals.

Machiavellis insight about the inner workings of absolutist governments in the prince

His father was a doctor of law. Machiavelli seems to have been carefully educated in humanistic studies, although he never learned Greek. He entered Florentine government service inat the age of 29, as second chancellor and secretary of the Ten of Liberty and Peace, an executive committee concerned with domestic as well as military and foreign affairs.

Niccolò Machiavelli

During his year tenure he was engaged in numerous and sometimes lengthy diplomatic missions which took him to France, Switzerland, and Germany. His dispatches and reports contain ideas that anticipate many of the doctrines of his later works.

Not only was the famous militia ordinance of his, but also the responsibility for implementing it, in the capacity of secretary of the specially constituted Nine of the Militia.

When the Florentine government was threatened in with the restoration of the Medici by Spanish forces, Machiavelli skillfully mobilized an army of twelve thousand conscripts to withstand the invasion; however, the amateur citizen-soldiers proved ineffectual before seasoned troops.

Machiavellis insight about the inner workings of absolutist governments in the prince

With the restoration of the Medici, Machiavelli was briefly imprisoned and tortured. After 13 years of political inactivity he was recalled to government service by the Medici inbut two years later the Medici were overthrown, and the new republic again excluded Machiavelli from office.

He died inreceiving the last rites of the church.

At the time of Machiavelli's writing, Italy was divided into a number of city states, primarily Florence, Venice, the Papal States, and the Kingdom of Naples. Self-subversion of the Prince Within Machiavelli’s advice is another set of goals. was compared to the technician of politics and gained his insight through travel. Documents Similar To Machiavelli’s Dictionary. the renaissancebooklet. Uploaded by. api By arguing that the prince should turn his back on the few and explicitly favour the many, Machiavelli moves here beyond the classic Aristotelian and Polybian suggestion that the strongest form of government is the mixed one, whereby the one, the few and the many converge in a single constitution and share power via a mutual balance and control.

Machiavelli was a good father and an affectionate if unfaithful husband. Scrupulously honest, he was also generous and tolerant and had unusual courage and integrity. He excelled in witty conversation and storytelling.

As much a poet as a man of practical affairs, he was a dedicated republican who desired only to serve Florence rather than any particular party. He was an extraordinary literary artist and has long been recognized for his masterful prose style; as the author of the comedy Mandragola see — he has been acclaimed the equal of Moliere.

Method Machiavelli was neither a system builder nor a philosopher in a technical sense. In no single treatise did he rigorously expound his theory of man and government.

His views are presented in a diffuse and impressionistic fashion, scattered through a number of different works. At the same time, there is system and remarkable consistency to his ideas, even if the coherence is not the most obvious and depends to a degree upon imaginative reconstruction by the sensitive reader.

He examined politics in a detached, rational manner, analyzing the ways power can be acquired and maintained. He showed the kinds of actions that in varying situations will lead to political success or failure.

Although he was not concerned with moral and political obligation or with the analysis of moral and political concepts, a conception of a good society does inform most of his political writings. The sources of his approach are a matter of conjecture. He probably owed less to the traditional philosophers than to nonphilosophical classical writers—in particular, to Livy, Tacitus, Plutarch, Xenophon, Polybius, Vegetius, and Frontinus.

Machiavelli was not alone among his contemporaries in abandoning a moralistic approach to human behavior for a rational and objective one: That Machiavelli lived in a city whose very life was finance and commerce may also help to explain his method, which had some of the characteristics of a business calculation of profit and loss.

Another possible influence was the increasing conceptualization of government policy, since the thirteenth century, in terms of a notion of public utility: Machiavelli was heir to this late medieval tradition.

Machiavelli was essentially concerned with ascertaining the conditions of political success, and he sought to do so by determining what kinds of acts have proved beneficial and what kinds detrimental to the political actors who performed them.

In The Prince and the Discourses, written between and see ahe demonstrated the soundness of certain political precepts by using a kind of calculus: He used this method for military precepts, in these works and in The Art of War Again, his penchant for discovering general patterns is evident in his History of Florence, completed in frin which he sought to establish causal relationships in place of mere chronology.

Machiavellis insight about the inner workings of absolutist governments in the prince

It is a pioneer work in modern western European historical writing.Self-subversion of the Prince Within Machiavelli’s advice is another set of goals. was compared to the technician of politics and gained his insight through travel.

Documents Similar To Machiavelli’s Dictionary. the renaissancebooklet. Uploaded by. api A summary of Chapters XX–XXIII in Niccolò Machiavelli's The Prince. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Prince and what it means.

Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. The Discourses by Niccolo Machiavelli is the famous political schemers treatise on Republican government compared to principality (or dictatorship).

He is, of course, famous for his work "The Prince" which is classic bedtime reading for any want-to-be dictator or authoritarian ruler.4/5.

The Discourses by Niccolò Machiavelli

Ethics in Machiavelli's The Prince Niccolo Machiavelli () was an Italian statesman and political philosopher. He was employed on diplomatic missions as defence secretary of the Florentine republic, and was tortured when the Medici returned to power in The Prince (Italian: Il Principe [il ˈprintʃipe]) is a 16th-century political treatise by the Italian diplomat and political theorist Niccolò Machiavelli.

From correspondence a version appears to have been distributed in , using a Latin title, De Principatibus (Of Principalities).Author: Niccolò Machiavelli. This is because a wise prince "is always compelled to injure those who have made him the new ruler" in order to secure his control.

Although a prince "needs the goodwill of the inhabitants" to enter a state, it becomes impossible to maintain the people's "friendship" following a conquest.

The Prince Chapter 3 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes